Trijicon MRO Titanium Mount From American Defense Mfg

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Mim makes the MRO Mount lighter

Lighter is better–until it isn’t. Or maybe I can be more accurate by saying lighter is better until something is so light that it breaks. American Defense Manufacturing has taken low mass to a new arena with its Trijicon MRO mount made from titanium.

Innovation

American Defense Mfg. isn’t necessarily known for light weight. Instead they are known for practical. American Defense Mfg’s carbines and pistols are known for their solid execution of ambidextrous controls. These controls significantly simplify the manual of arms of the AR-15. Other features include over sized integral trigger guards and a flared magazine well which is ready to accept whatever AR-15 magazine you want to stuff into it.

 

ADM ambi controls titanium

American Defense Mfg is known for its UIC Rifles with full ambidextrous controls.

Although I haven’t spent much time with an ADM UIC rifle, I know that I would like to. My primary motivation is ADM’s reputation for innovation. That innovation takes us back to the Trijicon MRO full titanium mount.

ADM Ambi Controls

The ambidextrous bolt catch allows the bolt on UIC rifles to be locked to the rear without moving your hand from the firing grip.

Titanium vs. Aluminum

If you are looking for strong, but light, titanium is probably the answer. Ti is as strong as steel but with 45%-50% less mass. Generally, titanium is heavier than aluminum but the difference is that Ti is significantly stronger than aluminum. This means that you can use less titanium to make a part. The resulting part is often stronger and lighter. Titanium however, has its problems. Aluminum and iron (the main component of steel) are some of the most common metallic elements on earth. This makes them abundant and inexpensive. Titanium on the other hand is relatively rare. This increases the cost.

Comparison of the Aluminum and Titanium Mounts

The Ti Mount has significant open spaces to allow for weight reduction while capitalizing on the strength of Titanium. The Ti Mount is 42% lighter than aluminum with a shear strength of almost double.

If you have ever had the chance to watch parts being machined on a CNC machine, one of the things that might surprise you is the waste. A typical machine shop works to minimize waste through design and for Ti this makes complete sense. Why in the world would you want to have more than half the expensive material you begin with end up on the shop floor for recycling? You wouldn’t, but if you want light, that is the way it is gonna be.

Remember, Ti is heavier than Al. To have the strength but less weight than aluminum, that titanium needs to be cut away. This leads to waste and a price tag that is outside of what most are willing to pay for an optic mount.

Remember why I like that UIC Carbine? Yeah innovation. It’s the same reason I am impressed with the titanium mount for the MRO.

Out with the old.

ADM didn’t allow itself to be hemmed in by their current processes. When they wanted to go lighter AND stronger they turned to a technology that has been on the rise in America and in the firearms industry, Metal Injection Molding. Also known as MIM, metal injection molding relies on the injection of a powdered form of the base metal combined with a bonding agent into a mold as a liquid. The parts are then exposed to heat, a solvent, or both to remove the binding agent resulting in a fragile but light weight part. These parts, in the brown stage, are then exposed to heat to bring them close to the melting point where they maintain their light weight but gain significant strength.

The MIM advantage extends to titanium

The most important difference between metal injection molding and traditional machining is the ability to create intricate parts without excessive waste or costly machine time. American Defense Mfg has created a stronger, lighter part without piling Ti scrap on the floor and without making a horrendous dent in your pocket book.

A typical ADM Trijicon MRO Co-Witness Mount in aluminum weighs in at 2.3 oz and has a price tag of $92.00. The Trijicon MRO Full Titanium Co-Witness Mount is about 43% percent lighter at 1.3 oz. with a premium of $148. This is a weight savings of a full ounce for $50.

ADM Ti Mount titanium

By volume it looks as if the Titanium MRO mount is made mostly of air.

Now, not everyone cares about an ounce, but if you are going to be pushing the envelope carrying a rifle for long periods of time, or running at full velocity the weight savings might make the difference you need and may justify the additional cost.

It should be noted that the weight isn’t the only benefit you get with Ti. If you are focused on precision know that the properties of titanium means that your mount responds less to heat expansion resulting in less shift in zero.

Other Benefits of ADM Mounts

Both the aluminum and titanium sights have AMD’s patented QD Auto Lock Lever which adjusts without proprietary tools. You adjust the lever with your fingers and can lock it to the front or the rear. At the same time the simple lever increases the surface area you are clamping to. The result is an easy to adjust, secure mounting solution.

QD Auto Lock Lever titanium

The Titanium MRO Mount uses ADM’s patented Auto Lock Lever which allows for no tool adjustment, locking the lever to the front or rear, and more contact area for a more secure hold.

What do you think?

An ounce less, nearly twice the strength, and just a touch more than aluminum offerings from competitors the Trijicon MRO Full Titanium Mount from American Defense Manufacturing incorporates innovation on top of typical AMD quality. I’m looking forward to taking this mount for a spin when it begins shipping this summer.

How important is light weight to you? Is the cost of titanium worth the strength and weight savings? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

  • JDT

    I would like to see some drop test on that Ti mount.

  • Will Roan

    “Titanium is as strong as steel”

    Is it 1990? At one point this was a TEKTAT(things everyone “knows” that aren’t true) but I thought in 2019 we had dispelled this misnomer. It isn’t true in any sense in which it is commonly used. Aluminum and titanium are stronger than steel by weight, but not by volume. A steel rod weighing 10lbs is not as strong as a titanium or aluminum rod weighing the same, but they would also be 2/3 again and 3 times the size, respectively. We don’t generally substitute a lighter metal and then almost double, or triple the size of the piece. Where structural rigidity is unimportant, or Lee’s important than weight savings, like in an aircraft skin or a race car frame, the trade-off is acceptable. But neither metal has comparable yield or tensile strength compared to steel. Titanium gets much of its reputation from its tendency to wear out tooling, but that is not a function of its strength, rather of its friction coefficient with various tool materials, again, compared to steel. The ONLY advantages titanium has over steel are it’s lower density and resistance to corrosion. So please, stop parroting this old myth that titanium is stronger than steel. It’s stronger than aluminum, it’s just lighter than steel.

    • David Higginbotham

      I’ll get back in and make sure the implication is clear. DH

    • http://silverdoctors.com BonesJones Gunny

      I think you are making valid points but I’d like to see the numbers and science behind your assertions. I was here to say it depends on how you define STRENGTH.
      A link would be greatly appreciated 😎👍