158 – The One Thing You Should Practice Everyday

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Daniel Shaw and Varg Freeborn discuss Self-control on the maglife podcast.

In episode 158 we discuss individual/personal mission and its importance particularly in the context of current events. We are seeing substantial division across the country on social media, in the news, on the streets (often in the form of protests and even riots) emphasizing the civil unrest. Helping people understand their mission, particularly in the context of self-defense or the defense of others, is important for many reasons — not least to demonstrate the dangers of stepping outside your mission.

 

Listen to the podcast for some fresh, new content. Below you’ll find a few excerpts. Some (by no means all) of the topics you’ll hear include:

  • 2:25 Host Daniel Shaw identifies his personal mission
  • 3:48 Discrepancies between mission and action
  • 5:52 Knowing when to intervene
  • 6:10 Two examples of mission: Shooter Rughi
  • 8:10  Having a clear mission with a clear plan
  • 9:34 Mission violation and how it happens
  • 11:30 The consequences of violating mission
  • 12:21 The role of ego
  • 13:44 Self-control as a practice
  • 18:00 What host Daniel Shaw wishes he had learned earlier in life
Varg Freeborn instructing on the range.

Varg Freeborn teaching on the range: gun-handling skills are important if you’re going to carry a firearm, but so too is the proper mindset. Crucial to a proper mindset is an understanding of a personal mission.

Podcast Host: Daniel Shaw

Co-Host: Varg Freeborn

Producer and Transcriptionist: Leah Ramsden

 


 

The Importance of Mission

Defining It

1:00 Asked what mission means to a regular armed citizen [or] law enforcement officer, VF responds,  

“Mission is, primarily what you’re willing to do, what you’re allowed to do, who you’re going to do it to, having all those questions answered before anything ever happens.It’s made up of boundaries, external and internal parameters;

External being the use of force policies or rule of law – what’s allowed for self-defense in the area or municipality you live in, understanding those things helps determine your mission.

And your internal parameters; what are you willing to kill or die for. How can you set yourself up for the moral aftermath of what might be involved in defending yourself, is that a part of your parameters?

Your mission is built from understanding what lengths you’re willing to go through and what your limitations are.  – that’s going to determine your gear, how you train, it really is what drives the whole train.”

Violations: Mission vs Action

“If you step out of your house every day and you say your primary mission is to protect your family and yourself so you can live out your life with your family…then you go out and you get involved in every fight that you see happening because you want to be the hero. That’s a discrepancy between mission and action…

If you can’t have a majority of these decisions made before the fight, you’re going to stumble during the fight. You’re going to have hesitations and, you’re going to have uncertainties, those are things that we train to eliminate in fighting so that we can be effective…And you can’t do that if you’re unclear about; what you’re willing to do, who you’re willing to do it to, when you’re willing to do it.”

“There’s this huge plethora of consequences, unintended but very avoidable consequences that will come from violating your mission…You could have consequences that you are not properly equipped because you stepped into something bigger that what you [had prepared] for.”

An upside down flag carried by a protester in Minneapolis: would it serve your mission to intervene in this, or even to stay in the area and observe?

Before you step forward to intervene in something you must weigh that action and its possible consequences against your mission. Will taking that action impede your primary mission? Does it put anyone else – who actually be your mission – at risk? Is it prudent, proper, or pragmatic to take action? This holds true whether you’re at the grocery store or caught up in riotous civil unrest.

Importance of Self Control: Separating Ego

14:00 Asked, How do you practice self-control? Is it easy for you? VF responds,

“Absolutely not! If anyone gets angry about stuff… I’m up there…

If you allow [your ego] to push you into a confrontation, I would hope that you didn’t have a mission to get into every ego-based confrontation that you could find in a given day because somebody makes you mad.

The way to handle situations like that is to put your ego aside and understand that your ego and your feelings don’t have anything to do with your mission and it needs to be separated. You can never allow your emotions or your ego to push you into a confrontation because that simply cannot attach to a well thought out, properly formed mission.”

“…Hatred is at a high, all this hatred, all this division – it gets worse and worse and people think they can say whatever. Self-control is a constant thing in [our] environment. All day long you deal with annoyances and disruptive behavior by people. Every single instance of that is the opportunity to practice self-control.”

“Self control isn’t just something we practice on the range or in the gym, it’s something we practice all day […It could save your life].”Varg Freeborn

Violence of Mind, a book by Varg Freeborn

A book covering the topic of self-defense from Varg’s, first-hand perspective. It covers criminal violence, self-defense, lethal force, mindset, firearms training, and concealment.

See live video discussions, join in chats, or ask questions during future conversations by following Daniel on Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/danielshaw0369

Get your Violence of Mind copy today: https://amzn.to/38UlNRZ

More information, background, and learning opportunities: https://vargfreeborn.com/.

Support the show! Use the free Twitch Prime subscription that comes with Amazon prime to subscribe on Twitch. Hit that donation button if you’d like, but remember: the best way to support the show is always to share it with your friends.

 

Be safe, self-disciplined, and mindful of your mission! Looking to get some more learn on? Take a look at other episodes of our tactical podcast.

Next up: More the knowledge, lesser the ego

 

Gunmag Warehouse’s own Director of Marketing, Daniel Shaw is a retired US Marine Infantry Unit Leader with multiple combat tours and instructor titles.  Since retirement from the Marine Corps, Daniel teaches Armed Citizens and Law Enforcement Officers weapons, tactics and use of force.

Daniel takes his life of training and combat experience and develops as well as presents curriculum and creates digital media content to help Law Enforcement, US Military and Responsible Armed Citizens prepare for a deadly force encounter.  When he isn’t directing marketing for Gunmag Warehouse, Daniel travels the US teaching and training under his company, Shaw Strategies, and discusses all things hoplological and self-defense related on The MagLife Podcast.

  • mikeiver

    Kind of sounds like common sense to me. Something that seems to be in very short supply now days on both the left and the right. Concieled carry is deadly serious and I would argue takes the utmost responsibility on the part of the person doing it. Ones goal, in my opinion, should always be to go out of the way to keep my weapon holstered. To talk thru and descalate a situation rather than reach for the final deadly solution. Having lived in LA for the early part of my life I carried concealed for all of them. I was always able to descalate rather than pull.

  • mercenary76

    hopefully the federal government will fix this before it gets out of the possibility of control . if not then one day you will wake up and the collapse will be underway and pitched battles in the streets will be the end . if you do not have an escape plan it will be too late . marxists will not tolerate any free thinkers from the old republic .